Sugary soft drinks increase pancreas cancer risk

“We know that sugar-sweetened beverages are cause-and-effect for obesity and diabetes,” “We just have to stop drinking sugary beverages,” Those beverages include soda pop, energy and sports drinks as well as fruit beverages, sweetened iced teas and homemade sugary drinks like frescas. “It’s liquid candy,” “Canadians are often unaware of how much sugar they’re consuming in beverage form. And the more you drink, the higher your risk is of these adverse health effects,” Sugary drinks are the main source of added sugars in the Canadian diet, said Lesley James, a health policy analyst at the Heart and Stroke Foundation. “There’s no intrinsic health value to it. There’s plenty of replacements. This is an easy problem to fix. “There’s no intrinsic health value to it. There’s plenty of replacements. This is an easy problem to fix. .Now a new study, holds sugary drinks responsible for the death of 1,600 Canadians annually..

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A study found that diabetes induced by excessive consumption of sugary beverages was responsible for more than 70 per cent of those deaths, with cardiovascular disease and cancer trailing behind at 25 per cent and four per cent respectively.

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Drinking two or more soft drinks per week nearly doubles a person’s risk of developing pancreatic cancer, says a new study released Monday that followed over 60,000 people for a period of 14 years.  http://toronto.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100208/softdrink_pancreatic_100208/20100208/?hub=TorontoNewHome
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Researchers examined the risks associated with those who drink sugar-sweetened carbonated drinks, versus those who don’t consume these beverages.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly forms of cancer, and only 5 per cent of people who are diagnosed are known to survive five years later, according to the American Cancer Society. About 3,900 Canadians were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year. Globally, that number is about 230,000.

“The high levels of sugar in soft drinks may be increasing the level of insulin in the body, which we think contributes to pancreatic cancer cell growth,” lead researcher Mark Pereira of the University of Minnesota said in a statement. Insulin helps the body metabolize sugar, and is produced in the pancreas.

Pereira and his colleagues followed 60,524 men and women in Singapore for 14 years. Over that period, researchers found:

  • 140 of the volunteers developed pancreatic cancer.
  • An 87 per cent higher risk of developing cancer for those who drank two or more soft drinks per week.
  • No link found between drinking fruit juice and developing pancreatic cancer.

Pereira says the findings would apply to western countries as well.

“Singapore is a wealthy country with excellent healthcare. Favourite pastimes are eating and shopping, so the findings should apply to other western countries,” he said.

He points out that while sugar may be to blame, those who drink sugar-sweetened soda often have other poor health habits.

Jennifer Sygo, a nutritionist with the Cleveland Clinic, says there isn’t the same level of research available for sugar as there is for salt. But she points out guidelines by the American Heart Association, which recommends:

  • Women should not consume more than 25 grams of added sugar a day (6.5 teaspoons);
  • Men should not consume more than 38 grams of added sugar a day (9.5 teaspoons).

Just by cutting sugar intake by half, or even one-third, it would make a big difference. For those who just need their sugar fix, many  recommend  a cup of juice a day, then water or a Perrier if you need some carbonation.

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Occasional sweets are OK. But it’s foods like fruits, vegetables, cereals, breads, rice, and other grains that give your body the vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other nutrients that it needs. It doesn’t matter what disease we are talking about, whether we are talking about a common cold or about cardiovascular disease, or cancer or osteoporosis, the root is always going to be at the cellular and molecular level, and more often than not insulin is going to have its hand in it, if not totally controlling it. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0846/is_8_22/ai_98594272/

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The health dangers which ingesting sugar on an habitual basis creates are certain. Simple sugars have been observed to aggravate asthma, move mood swings, provoke personality changes, muster mental illness, nourish nervous disorders, deliver diabetes, hurry heart disease, grow gallstones, hasten hypertension, and add arthritis.

The list of health problems associated with sugar is quite lengthy and growing by the year. Some generalities include the following:

  • depression
  • mood swings
  • irritability
  • hyperactivity
  • anxiety
  • panic attacks
  • mineral deficiencies
  • adrenal gland depletion
  • hypoglycemia
  • candida overgrowth
  • increased cholesterol levels
  • chronic fatigue

Then we get into the more serious diseases and disorders, as cancers, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. Sugar, even in small amounts, suppresses the immune system making it easier to succumb to the various ailments. It should be noted though that there is a very significant difference between white refined sugar and naturally occurring complex sugars found in whole foods.

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Here again is a list of ways sugar can affect your health:

  • Sugar can suppress the immune system.
  • Sugar can upset the body’s mineral balance.
  • Sugar can contribute to hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, concentration difficulties, and crankiness in children.
  • Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
  • Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.
  • Sugar can reduce helpful high density cholesterol (HDLs).
  • Sugar can promote an elevation of harmful cholesterol (LDLs).
  • Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
  • Sugar contributes to a weakened defense against bacterial infection.
  • Sugar can cause kidney damage.
  • Sugar can increase the risk of coronary heart disease.
  • Sugar may lead to chromium deficiency.
  • Sugar can cause copper deficiency.
  • Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
  • Sugar can increase fasting levels of blood glucose.
  • Sugar can promote tooth decay.
  • Sugar can produce an acidic stomach.
  • Sugar can raise adrenaline levels in children.
  • Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
  • Sugar can speed the aging process, causing wrinkles and grey hair.
  • Sugar can increase total cholesterol.
  • Sugar can contribute to weight gain and obesity.
  • High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
  • Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
  • Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
  • Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
  • Sugar leads to decreased glucose tolerance.
  • Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
  • Sugar can increase systolic blood pressure.
  • Sugar causes food allergies.
  • Sugar can cause free radical formation in the bloodstream.
  • Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
  • Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
  • Sugar can overstress the pancreas, causing damage.
  • Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
  • Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
  • Sugar can cause liver cells to divide, increasing the size of the liver.
  • Sugar can increase the amount of fat in the liver.
  • Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
  • Sugar can cause depression.
  • Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.
  • Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance.
  • Sugar can cause hypertension.
  • Sugar can cause headaches, including migraines.
  • Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha and theta brain waves, which can alter the mind’s ability to think clearly.
  • Sugar can increase blood platelet adhesiveness which increases risk of blood clots and strokes.
  • Sugar can increase insulin responses in those consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.
  • Sugar increases bacterial fermentation in the colon.

Source: www.nancyappleton.com

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To be sure, sugar is needed by the body for energy. However, far too many people are getting too much of a good thing – way too much.

Excessive sugar consumption is the major cause of an imbalance of all minerals especially:

  • calcium
  • magnesium
  • manganese
  • chromium
  • zinc
  • copper
  • cobalt (necessary for vitamin B12)
  • chromium (together with insulin, stimulates cells to absorb and metabolize sugar)

This imbalance leads to degenerative diseases including heart disease, osteoporosis, some anemias, and diabetes Studies have shown that individuals who continued on a high fiber diet for several months showed increased normalization of blood sugar levels. High fiber diets also lessen the sugar in the urine, and lowers fasting blood sugar levels and medication requirements.

Diets which include 20-35 grams of fiber per day is the ideal amount. Good sources of fiber are the following:

  • dry or cooked oat bran
  • cooked oatmeal
  • black-eyed peas
  • kidney or pinto beans
  • split peas
  • butter beans
  • lentils
  • fresh peas
  • baked potatoes with skins
  • brussels sprouts
  • corn
  • zucchini
  • prunes
  • apricots
  • broccoli

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Just when we got the hang of baking with applesauce instead of oil and forgoing Chips Ahoy for SnackWell’s, the diet gurus throw us another curveball: Forget counting fat grams, they say. The real villain is sugar!

According to a slew of recent diet books, it’s sugar, not fat, that causes chronic overeating and adds extra pounds that wont budge. Their solution: Slash sugar from the diet completely.

Give wonderful, delicious sugar the boot (gulp) forever? We couldn’t bear it. So we asked leading nutrition experts to give it to us straight, Before you consider dumping your Twizzlers or denying yourself dessert, find out what the experts say about the truth–and the hype–when it comes to the sweet stuff.

Sugar Myth #1: You should eliminate all sugar from your diet.

First, a quick and painless science lesson: Sugars, aka carbohydrates, are made of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Individually, these strings of molecules are called monosaccharides, which include sugars such as fructose (found in fruit). Link two sets of molecules together and you have disaccharides, such as sucrose (table sugar) and lactose (the sugar found in milk). Combine a whole bunch of units, producing an even more complex molecule, and you’ve got starches and fiber.

And no matter what form you eat–from Gummi Bears to Wheaties–carbs contain 4 calories per gram, break down to simple sugars during digestion (except for fiber, which is indigestible) and are either used for immediate energy or stored for later. In other words, you need sugars in your diet to keep your body running. Most should come in the form of nutrient-rich starches like whole grains and cereals. You should also eat plenty of fruits, vegetables and lowfat dairy products–which contain sugars, but also valuable vitamins, minerals and disease-fighting chemicals.

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One response

  1. Pingback: Cancer, heart attacks and the type of food we eat « Healthy Living

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